Thousands of cheering spectators filled the south lawn of the State Capitol to watch Gov. Mark Dayton sign a bill legalizing same-sex marriage into law.

See more photos here.

Ice drums. Ice horns. An iceophone. These are just some of the instruments Norwegian musician Terje Isungset will bring to the Cedar Cultural Center stage tonight. Reporter Nikki Tundel captured the makings of an ice concert.

The ice used to make the instruments comes from Twin Cities lakes. “Artificial ice doesn’t work,” says musician Terje Isungset. “We don’t know why. It just doesn’t resonate like ice from a lake.”

Prince wouldn’t let cameras in to his performances at the Dakota, so Local Current blogger Andrea Swensson did her own artist rendering of last night’s show.
Read her whole recap here. His last two shows are tonight.

Prince wouldn’t let cameras in to his performances at the Dakota, so Local Current blogger Andrea Swensson did her own artist rendering of last night’s show.

Read her whole recap here. His last two shows are tonight.

"I’ve seen our singing be a part of social change. I’ve seen our singing bring our people together during times of the worst times of mourning and death. I’ve seen our singing celebrate on Easter morning. It strengthens us. I love the Ojibwe hymn singing. I hope I can sing it until I draw my last breath."

White Earth Tribal Chair Erma Vizenor on Ojibwe hymn singing. Although Christian clergy tried to end traditional Indian spiritual practices, Vizenor said, the native-language hymns the church brought the reservation have become part of the complex Ojibwe culture. Listen here.

It was a drug store in 1882, then a saloon in 1890, then a hardware store during prohibition (wink, wink), and then has been a bar ever since. 

In an amazing oral history, Andrea Swensson traces the history of the 400 Bar from its days as a beatnik bar to its closing at the beginning of this year. In this video, Willie Murphy recalls the music that started being played there in the 1960s.

Read the whole article here.

The Minnesota Orchestral Association is holding its annual meeting today. Instead of the usual jovial lunch for major donors peppered with performances from Minnesota orchestra musicians, today’s meeting will be held behind closed doors.
The mood will likely be somber as the board members reveal an expected multi-million dollar deficit from the 2011-2012 season. Both of Minnesota’s major orchestras are struggling financially. Musicians were all asked to take extensive pay cuts, which they did not agree to.
Now musicians at both orchestras have been locked out for several weeks and all concerts are cancelled through the end of the year. On top of that, no negotiations are scheduled for either organization.
This morning, Cathy Wurzer spoke with Drew McManus, a Chicago-based arts consultant who said that MnOrch’s situation is particularly bad compared to other orchestras that have gone through labor disputes.
Hear the interview — and read more from Marianne Combs.
(MPR Photo/Euan Kerr)

The Minnesota Orchestral Association is holding its annual meeting today. Instead of the usual jovial lunch for major donors peppered with performances from Minnesota orchestra musicians, today’s meeting will be held behind closed doors.

The mood will likely be somber as the board members reveal an expected multi-million dollar deficit from the 2011-2012 season. Both of Minnesota’s major orchestras are struggling financially. Musicians were all asked to take extensive pay cuts, which they did not agree to.

Now musicians at both orchestras have been locked out for several weeks and all concerts are cancelled through the end of the year. On top of that, no negotiations are scheduled for either organization.

This morning, Cathy Wurzer spoke with Drew McManus, a Chicago-based arts consultant who said that MnOrch’s situation is particularly bad compared to other orchestras that have gone through labor disputes.

Hear the interview — and read more from Marianne Combs.

(MPR Photo/Euan Kerr)

It doesn’t get any better than a bluegrass musician who also does turkey calls. Does it?
Reporter Dan Olson talked to on Dick Kimmel, who has spent more than 30 years helping restore Minnesota’s wild turkey population and is now working on restoring the state’s population of bluegrass pickers.This is one of those stories where the audio is essential. Listen.
(MPR Photo/Jennifer Simonson)

It doesn’t get any better than a bluegrass musician who also does turkey calls. Does it?

Reporter Dan Olson talked to on Dick Kimmel, who has spent more than 30 years helping restore Minnesota’s wild turkey population and is now working on restoring the state’s population of bluegrass pickers.This is one of those stories where the audio is essential. Listen.

(MPR Photo/Jennifer Simonson)